OUTREACH

I believe outreach is a crucial part of the life of a scientist, since science is a global effort and it ought to be shared with the broader public.

I have been active in this since the beginning of my Master studies, thanks to the Italian outreach organization Inco.Scienza.

For instance, I have been a 'science guide' in an outreach installation about the Higgs boson organized by INFN, I have spoken about the role of symmetries in fundamental physics (a video is available in Italian), I have hosted question-driven Sunday-night chats about various astrophysical topics (picture), and I have spoken about symmetries in physics at the Modena Planetarium.

 

I have been one of the organizers of the Bonn leg of Astronomy on Tap, I am in the team of Pint of Science Munich and I often take part in the Skype A Scientists project.

Outreach event JingNobel in Modena: a question-driven chat about gravitational waves. More pictures here.

SCI-ART

I believe there is a profound beauty in science. Equations, symmetries, models, and plots. For this reason, I try to take results from my research and mix them with art. This can show the beauty hidden in science, and hopefully close the gap with the general public. Below you can find a sample of such plots I am proud of. Enjoy!

(Hey! Some of the pictures have a link at the end of their description that will bring you to the movie)

Warhol galaxy
Warhol galaxy

A tribute to Andy Warhol. Each panel shows the trajectories of dark matter particles that end up in a halo (located at the center of the image). The colors are taken from the 'Che Guevara' by Andy Warhol.

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Galactic accretion
Galactic accretion

Each column shows the trajectories of gas (top) and stars (bottom) particles that end up in a different old (left) or young (right) halo (located at the center of the image).

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A pie in the sky
A pie in the sky

On large scales, the Universe resembles a giant web. But the appearance of this cosmic web is very different when seen through different observables. The image shows some of these looks using a slice through the output from a numerical simulation. The quantities shown are, from the top slice in clockwise order: the matter (over)density, hydrogen neutral fraction, gas temperature, metallicity (= mass fraction of elements heavier than helium), and stellar mass (relative to the Sun mass).

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Warhol galaxy
Warhol galaxy

A tribute to Andy Warhol. Each panel shows the trajectories of dark matter particles that end up in a halo (located at the center of the image). The colors are taken from the 'Che Guevara' by Andy Warhol.

press to zoom
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